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September 2022 Wallace’s Farmer “MarketPlace Extra”

There are few markets that have changed as much (or as quickly) as the farmland market of the past 2 years. During this time, all the factors came together to create a “Goldilocks” market – strong crop yields, historically high commodity prices, generationally low interest rates, and more demand than supply of farms to buy.

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August 2022 Wallace’s Farmer “MarketPlace Extra”

We enjoyed some beneficial rains in early July and entered into pollination time across Iowa in pretty good shape. Now, we just need a couple timely rains to finish off what should be an average to average-plus crop!

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July 2022 Wallace’s Farmer “MarketPlace Extra”

With warmer temps and adequate moisture (for now!) in most corners of the state of Iowa have the crop off to a very promising start.

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Answering Your Burning Questions About CRP Burns

For thousands of years, fire has been a natural and effective method for improving wildlife habitats. Today, we still use fire to meet some of our land management goals, but instead of letting a fire happen from a lightning strike, we use different strategies and tools to start and control fires so we can purposefully burn a certain area or patch of land. This practice is referred to as a controlled burn.

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Farmland Value Update - June 2022

After an incredible run like we had in 2021, the natural question is, “Can it continue?” Doug Hensley answers this question and more in our Farmland Value Upate.

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Grain Markets - June 2022

Farmers and landowners across the Midwest sell their crops for market values determined by factors mostly out of their control. Grain marketing continues to be full of uncertainty as international conflicts, global logistics, energy and fertilizer supply, and weather concerns actively affect the markets. We are in a unique year with both historically high grain and fertilizer prices.

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Effects of Russia – Ukraine conflict will continue into 2023 crop year

“Even if the conflict is solved tomorrow, there will still be long-term effects,” noted Cortney Cowley, senior economist at the Kansas City Federal Reserve Bank. The World Bank estimates crop fertilizer prices to rise about 70% in 2022 before falling slightly in 2023 [from atmospheric levels].

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